Cross-Border Teaching and Collaboration

Building on Best Practices: Transforming Legal Education in a Changing World (Deborah Maranville, Lisa Radtke Bliss, Carolyn Wilkes Kaas & Antoinette Sedillo Lopez eds., 2015)

University of Washington School of Law Research Paper

12 Pages Posted: 5 Feb 2015 Last revised: 24 May 2017

See all articles by Kimberly D. Ambrose

Kimberly D. Ambrose

University of Washington - School of Law

William Fernholz

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law

Catherine F. Klein

Catholic University of America (CUA) - Columbus School of Law

Dana Raigrodski

University of Washington - School of Law

Stephen A. Rosenbaum

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law

Leah Wortham

Catholic University of America (CUA) - Columbus School of Law

Date Written: January 30, 2015

Abstract

Since the publication of Best Practices for Legal Education, the globalization of both legal education and law practice has exploded. Today’s lawyers increasingly serve border-crossing clients or clients who present with transnational legal issues. As law schools expand their international programs, and enroll increasing numbers of non-U.S. law students, law students transcend cultural and legal borders. As a result, they deepen their understanding of — and sharpen their critical perspective on — their own national systems. Similarly, U.S. law teachers are increasingly called to engage in border-crossing teaching and other academic pursuits.

Best Practices did not address these issues. The primary aim of this section of the forthcoming book Building on Best Practices: Transforming Legal Education in a Changing World (Lexis 2015) is to identify best practices for law teachers engaged with non-U.S. or “international” learners who study or train in a U.S.-style learning environment, either in the United States or abroad. This section also addresses collaboration of U.S. law teachers with their counterparts abroad in such areas as developing innovative teaching and clinical legal education, training and research. It identifies eight guiding principles that cut across types of international learning and then applies these principles to three specific contexts: 1) teaching international students in U.S. law school settings; 2) integrating international students in U.S.-based clinics; and 3) collaborating in legal education and reform efforts with law teachers abroad.

The content of this SSRN posting is material that was published in the book Building on Best Practices: Transforming Legal Education in a Changing World, Maranville, et al., Lexis Nexis 2015. The content has been posted on SSRN with the express permission of Lexis Nexis and of Carolina Academic Press, publisher of the book as of January 1, 2016.

Note: The content of this SSRN posting is material that was published in the book Building on Best Practices: Transforming Legal Education in a Changing World, Maranville, et al., Lexis Nexis 2015. The content has been posted on SSRN with the express permission of Lexis Nexis and of Carolina Academic Press, publisher of the book as of January 1, 2016.

Keywords: legal education, law schools, law teaching, international education, global education, cultural competency, intercultural effectiveness, cross-cultural education, foreign students, LL.M. programs, law school clinics, clinical education

Suggested Citation

Ambrose, Kimberly D. and Fernholz, William and Klein, Catherine F. and Raigrodski, Dana and Rosenbaum, Stephen A. and Wortham, Leah, Cross-Border Teaching and Collaboration (January 30, 2015). Building on Best Practices: Transforming Legal Education in a Changing World (Deborah Maranville, Lisa Radtke Bliss, Carolyn Wilkes Kaas & Antoinette Sedillo Lopez eds., 2015) ; University of Washington School of Law Research Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2558255

Kimberly D. Ambrose

University of Washington - School of Law ( email )

William H. Gates Hall
Box 353020
Seattle, WA 98105-3020
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.washington.edu/directory/profile.aspx?ID=114

William Fernholz

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law ( email )

215 Boalt Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720-7200
United States
510-643-4447 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: https://www.law.berkeley.edu/php-programs/faculty/facultyProfile.php?facID=938

Catherine F. Klein

Catholic University of America (CUA) - Columbus School of Law ( email )

3600 John McCormack Rd., NE
Washington, DC 20064
United States

Dana Raigrodski (Contact Author)

University of Washington - School of Law ( email )

Seattle, WA 98195
United States
206-616-5321 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.washington.edu/Directory/Profile.aspx?ID=26

Stephen A. Rosenbaum

University of California, Berkeley - School of Law ( email )

Berkeley, CA 94720-7200
United States

Leah Wortham

Catholic University of America (CUA) - Columbus School of Law ( email )

3600 John McCormack Rd., NE
Washington, DC 20064
United States
202-319-5008 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.edu/fac-staff/worthaml/

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