The Networked Practice of Online Political Satire in China: Between Ritual and Resistance

International Communication Gazette (2015) DOI: 10.1177/1748048514568757

Posted: 10 Feb 2015

See all articles by Guobin Yang

Guobin Yang

University of Pennsylvania

Min Jiang

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Charlotte

Date Written: February 2015

Abstract

Online political satire is an important aspect of Chinese Internet culture and politics. Current scholarship focuses on its contents and views it primarily from the perspective of resistance. By reconceptualizing online political satire as a networked practice, this article shifts the focus of analysis from contents to practice. Five types of networked practices of online political satire are identified and analyzed. Practices which mainly fulfill social functions are referred to as ritual satire and distinguished from explicitly political practices. The article thus shows that online political satire has multiple meanings and uses. Its proliferation in Chinese digital spaces results from the complex and interlocked conditions of politics, technology, history, and culture.

Keywords: China, Humor, Internet, Political Satire, Practice, Resistance, Ritual

Suggested Citation

Yang, Guobin and Jiang, Min, The Networked Practice of Online Political Satire in China: Between Ritual and Resistance (February 2015). International Communication Gazette (2015) DOI: 10.1177/1748048514568757, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2559716

Guobin Yang (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania ( email )

Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

Min Jiang

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Charlotte ( email )

9201 University City Boulevard
Charlotte, NC 28223
United States

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