'Fiat Panis' – Let There Be Bread (But Who Will Pay for it?) – United States and United Kingdom Laws, Policies and Conduct of Humanitarian and Civic Assistance (HCA) Missions Since the 1990s

Journal of Humanitarian Assistance, Online, 2004

30 Pages Posted: 9 Feb 2015

See all articles by Kevin H. Govern

Kevin H. Govern

Ave Maria University - Ave Maria School of Law

Date Written: February 1, 2004

Abstract

The cataclysmic events of past decades have included numerous man-made and natural disasters, regional wars, and other humanitarian crises precipitating single and multi-state foreign interventions and “military operations other than war.” For this reason, legal scholars, practitioners, and those generally in the humanitarian assistance field, should have a firm understanding of humanitarian assistance as an evolving concept. This is a brief primer on the legal aspects of military-based, international humanitarian and civic assistance (HCA), with an emphasis on U.K. and U.S.authorities and limitations.

HCA, as a concept, must be understood within domestic and foreign policy, as well as military and non-governmental organizational contexts. These missions, aiding peoples and nations, are planned and unplanned consequences of other missions, policies, and initiatives. Numerous military missions from the past show how unplanned HCA missions arise through “mission evolution and “mission creep.”

Current U.K (Parliamentary and Cabinet) and U.S. (Executive and Congressional) concerns for future military operations impact on HCA-related policies and laws. Military (and other governmental and nongovernmental organizational) doctrine and plans need to create consistent, clear, and coordinated guidelines reflecting HCA missions competing with other politico-military objectives, done with less money, and fewer assets than in the past. Based on those changing policies and realities, this article will close with six conclusions about when and how HCA missions should be conducted.

Keywords: Humanitarian and Civic Assistance, HCA, Disaster Relief, United Kingdom, UK, United States, US, domestic policy, foreign policy, civil-military affairs, National Defense

JEL Classification: F35, H56, I30, K10, K33; K42, L30, N40, Q10, Z10

Suggested Citation

Govern, Kevin H., 'Fiat Panis' – Let There Be Bread (But Who Will Pay for it?) – United States and United Kingdom Laws, Policies and Conduct of Humanitarian and Civic Assistance (HCA) Missions Since the 1990s (February 1, 2004). Journal of Humanitarian Assistance, Online, 2004. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2562108

Kevin H. Govern (Contact Author)

Ave Maria University - Ave Maria School of Law ( email )

1025 Commons Circle
Naples, FL 34119
United States
(239) 687-5390 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://https://www.avemarialaw.edu/faculty/kevin-h-govern/

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