Broken People, Deep Scars, Fractured Communities, Fear and Distrust: Affinity Fraud and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

54 Pages Posted: 12 Feb 2015

See all articles by Gregory Gunn

Gregory Gunn

University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law

Date Written: February 9, 2015

Abstract

Recently, the number of affinity fraud schemes perpetrated on members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has risen with Utah having one of the highest rates of affinity fraud in the United States. Affinity fraud poses significant harm to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the Church should take a more active role in educating its membership. This article hopes to break new ground by examining the unique social and legal problems of affinity fraud against members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and provide recommendations for Church leaders to combat this problem. Typically, responses to affinity fraud have been legislative, passive education, or active education. I argue that, although a legislative response or passive education response may deter some would be fraudsters, a stronger response — and what I assert as necessary — would be an active education response by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that included increased discussion, training, and educational materials in an effort to better warn and teach members of the Church regarding the dangers of affinity fraud.

Suggested Citation

Gunn, Gregory, Broken People, Deep Scars, Fractured Communities, Fear and Distrust: Affinity Fraud and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (February 9, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2562462 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2562462

Gregory Gunn (Contact Author)

University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law ( email )

383 S. University Street
SLC, UT

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