All of This Has Happened Before and All of This Will Happen Again: Innovation in Copyright Licensing

43 Pages Posted: 15 Feb 2015

Date Written: 2014

Abstract

Claims that copyright licensing can substitute for fair use have a long history. This article focuses on a new cycle of the copyright licensing debate, which has brought revised arguments in favor of universal copyright licensing. First, the new arrangements offered by large copyright owners often purport to sanction the large-scale creation of derivative works, rather than mere reproductions, which were the focus of earlier blanket licensing efforts. Second, the new licenses are often free. Rather than demanding royalties as in the past, copyright owners just want a piece of the action — along with the right to claim that unlicensed uses are infringing. In a world where licenses are readily and cheaply available, the argument will go, it is unfair not to get one. This development, copyright owners hope, will combat increasingly fair use — favorable case law.

This article describes three key examples of recent innovations in licensing-like arrangements in the noncommercial or formerly noncommercial spheres — Getty Images’ new free embedding of millions of its photos, YouTube’s Content ID, and Amazon’s Kindle Worlds — and discusses how uses of works under these arrangements differ from their unlicensed alternatives in ways both subtle and profound. These differences change the nature of the communications and communities at issue, illustrating why licensing can never substitute for transformative fair use even when licenses are routinely available. Ultimately, as courts have already recognized, the mere desire of copyright owners to extract value from a market — especially when they desire to extract it from third parties rather than licensees — should not affect the scope of fair use.

Keywords: copyright, licensing, fair use, constitutional law

JEL Classification: K00, K30, K39, O34

Suggested Citation

Tushnet, Rebecca, All of This Has Happened Before and All of This Will Happen Again: Innovation in Copyright Licensing (2014). Berkeley Technology Law Journal, Vol. 28, pp. 1447-1488, 2014. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2564535

Rebecca Tushnet (Contact Author)

Harvard Law School ( email )

Cambridge, MA
United States

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