Climate Change Adaptation Assets and Group-Based Approaches: Gendered Perceptions from Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Mali, and Kenya

28 Pages Posted: 10 Mar 2015 Last revised: 18 Mar 2015

See all articles by Noora-Lisa Aberman

Noora-Lisa Aberman

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Snigdha Ali

BRAC, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Julia Behrman

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Elizabeth Bryan

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Peter Davis

University of Bath - Department of Economics

Aiveen Donnelly

Independent

Violet Gathaara

Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) - Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization

Daouda Koné

Independent

Teresiah Nganga

Independent

Jane Ngugi

Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) - Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization

Barrack Okoba

Independent

Carla Roncoli

Emory University

Date Written: January 30, 2015

Abstract

People who rely on natural resources for their livelihoods are more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and are often limited in their capacity to adapt to the changes. Vulnerability to climate change is exacerbated when individuals’ asset base is limited or insecure. Because control over assets is highly influenced by gender - with women typically controlling fewer low-value assets than men, which are more likely to be disposed of during shocks - it is important to understand the gender dynamics of climate change adaptation and the use of assets in this process. Using a participatory rural appraisal approach, a series of qualitative studies were conducted in four countries facing negative impacts of climate change - Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Kenya and Mali - in order to determine men’s and women’s perceptions of climate change, adaptive approaches, and the degree to which assets and group participation play a role in adaptation strategies. Similarities were found across countries in terms of perceptions of climate change, impacts, and strategies for adaptation. Farmers and pastoralists, groups heavily dependent on natural resources, are starkly aware of and impacted by subtle climatic changes, and those with a stronger asset base were better able to adapt to changes and shocks. Social norms largely determine which physical assets women can own or control and how they gain ownership of them, often limiting women’s adaptive capacity. Groups were highlighted as a key strategy for adapting to climate change for men and women, primarily as a tool to facilitate asset development through group purchase of large farm appliances (physical capital), group loans (financial capital), or capacity development (human capital). Finally, the results illuminate the degree to which women’s and men’s adaptive approaches are intertwined as interdependent members of a household.

Keywords: gender, climate change, adaptation, assets, group-based approaches

Suggested Citation

Aberman, Noora-Lisa and Ali, Snigdha and Behrman, Julia and Bryan, Elizabeth and Davis, Peter and Donnelly, Aiveen and Gathaara, Violet and Koné, Daouda and Nganga, Teresiah and Ngugi, Jane and Okoba, Barrack and Roncoli, Carla, Climate Change Adaptation Assets and Group-Based Approaches: Gendered Perceptions from Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Mali, and Kenya (January 30, 2015). IFPRI Discussion Paper 01412. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2564556 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2564556

Noora-Lisa Aberman (Contact Author)

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Snigdha Ali

BRAC, Dhaka, Bangladesh ( email )

75 Mohakhali
BRAC Center, 75 Mohakhali ,Dhaka, Bangladesh
Dhaka, 1212
Bangladesh

Julia Behrman

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Elizabeth Bryan

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Peter Davis

University of Bath - Department of Economics ( email )

Claverton Down
Bath, BA2 7AY
United Kingdom

Aiveen Donnelly

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

Violet Gathaara

Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) - Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization ( email )

NAIROBI
Kenya

Daouda Koné

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

Teresiah Nganga

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

Jane Ngugi

Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) - Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization ( email )

Makindu
Kenya

Barrack Okoba

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

Carla Roncoli

Emory University ( email )

201 Dowman Drive
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
273
Abstract Views
1,263
rank
115,222
PlumX Metrics