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Diversity as a Law School Survival Strategy

53 Pages Posted: 27 Feb 2015  

Aaron N. Taylor

Saint Louis University - School of Law

Date Written: February 2015

Abstract

Over the past few years, law schools have been dealing with a drastic and, so far, unyielding decline in student interest. Between 2010 and 2013, student enrollments fell almost 25%, to levels not seen in 40 years. This trend has prompted many to wonder what schools have done, and what they can do, to ensure their survival in this new climate. This article explores the extent to which law schools have used students of color, particularly black and Hispanic students, to bolster enrollments and lessen the effects of the downturn. The results of this analysis suggest that a school’s median LSAT score influenced the extent to which the racial composition of its entering classes changed between 2010 and 2013. Black and Hispanic students were critical components of the enrollment management calculus for private law schools with the lowest median LSAT scores. Higher-median schools tended to rely more heavily on white and Asian enrollments to stem declines. These trends led to increased racial and ethnic stratification in law school enrollments, where black and Hispanic students were more likely to attend schools with lower median LSAT scores in 2013 than in 2010, while white and Asian students were more likely to attend schools with higher median scores. Perceptions of law school quality and prestige are greatly influenced by a school’s median LSAT score; therefore, the trend of stratification may only serve to intensify racial and ethnic differences in career paths and trajectories.

Suggested Citation

Taylor, Aaron N., Diversity as a Law School Survival Strategy (February 2015). Saint Louis U. Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2015-1. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2569847 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2569847

Aaron Taylor (Contact Author)

Saint Louis University - School of Law ( email )

100 N. Tucker Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63101
United States
314-977-3393 (Phone)

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