Judges and Social Media: Disclosure as Disinfectant

SMU Science & Technology Law Review, 2014

21 Pages Posted: 27 Feb 2015

See all articles by Benjamin P. Cooper

Benjamin P. Cooper

University of Mississippi School of Law

Date Written: October 29, 2014

Abstract

This Article, which was presented at the Social Media Law Symposium sponsored by the SMU Science & Technology Law Review, expands on the tentative thoughts that I previously offered on judges’ obligation to disclose social media connections. In this Article, I argue in favor of a bright line rule that judges should disclose all social media connections with lawyers, litigants and witnesses. Such a broad disclosure regime would serve two primary purposes. First, a broad disclosure rule would best serve the primary policy behind disclosure: maintaining the litigants’ and the public’s confidence in the judiciary. Second, this bright line rule would provide much needed clarity to judges who have been asking for guidance about how to use social media ethically.

Suggested Citation

Cooper, Benjamin P., Judges and Social Media: Disclosure as Disinfectant (October 29, 2014). SMU Science & Technology Law Review, 2014. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2570613

Benjamin P. Cooper (Contact Author)

University of Mississippi School of Law ( email )

Lamar Law Center
P.O. Box 1848
University, MS 38677
United States

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
62
Abstract Views
425
rank
371,647
PlumX Metrics