Jury Glasses: Wearable Technology and its Role in Crowdsourcing Justice

Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution (2015 Forthcoming)

37 Pages Posted: 6 Mar 2015

See all articles by Anjanette Raymond

Anjanette Raymond

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Law; Queen Mary University of London, School of Law; Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Scott Shackelford

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Law; Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs; Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research; Stanford Center for Internet and Society; Stanford Law School

Date Written: March 4, 2015

Abstract

This Article explores the growing development of wearables and immersive technology within the field of dispute resolution. It provides a hypothetical example of how these existing technologies could be used in combination with data gathering, analytics, and artificial intelligence to transform the justice system. The Article then explores the age-old limitations and biases that exist within the justice system and suggests the use of the newest technology could lessen the impact of these limitations and biases. Finally, the Article suggests a marriage of technology, dispute resolution, and the crowd that may produce outcomes that should be supported by the judiciary by making use of the conceptual framework of polycentric governance. However, this can only occur if safeguards are put in place to ensure an ethical, fair, just resolution of the issue for all parties concerned.

Keywords: immersive technology, wearable technology, dispute resolution, juror bias, Google Glass

Suggested Citation

Raymond, Anjanette and Shackelford, Scott J., Jury Glasses: Wearable Technology and its Role in Crowdsourcing Justice (March 4, 2015). Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution (2015 Forthcoming). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2573797

Anjanette Raymond

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Law ( email )

Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

Queen Mary University of London, School of Law ( email )

67-69 Lincoln’s Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3JB
United Kingdom

Indiana University Maurer School of Law ( email )

211 S. Indiana Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

Scott J. Shackelford (Contact Author)

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Law ( email )

Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs ( email )

79 JFK Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research ( email )

Wylie Hall 105
100 South Woodlawn
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

Stanford Center for Internet and Society ( email )

Palo Alto, CA
United States

Stanford Law School ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
96
Abstract Views
673
rank
269,057
PlumX Metrics