Abstract

https://ssrn.com/abstract=2579476
 


 



Troublesome Women and the Nanny State: Drawing Boundaries and Legislating Bifurcated Belonging in Patriarchal Singapore


Eugene Kheng Boon Tan


Singapore Management University - School of Law

September 1, 2014

Intersections: Gender and Sexuality in Asia and the Pacific, Issue 36, September 2014
Singapore Management University School of Law Research Paper No. 45/2015

Abstract:     
As a patriarchal state, government policies, societal norms and government regulations in Singapore mirror that normative ideal. Yet, as a sovereign nation-state, Singapore also seeks to be a global city. Like many open cities, Singapore is experiencing a rise in international marriages, a disconcerting declining birth rate, and the challenges of migration, including the immigration of foreign transient workers and professionals as well as the growth of a significant overseas Singaporean community.

Consequently, the citizenship regime in Singapore has to adapt in order to strategically bolster social and public policy as well as economic development. The imperative for Singapore to be intrinsically global (in terms of its people thinking and operating beyond Singapore’s borders) and outwardly global (so that Singapore remains attractive to talented foreigners) will generate a new set of political, socio-economic and cultural dynamics to challenge the status quo. This paper examines the regime governing immigration and citizenship in light of the demographic realities and changes.

The essay argues that the law and policy changes have been motivated by pragmatic considerations of demography, economics, and political governance. The essay contends that even with a more liberal attitude towards core issues such as citizenship, ethnic identities, and gender equality, there is the strong undercurrent of ensuring that the statist imperatives vis-à-vis the family, citizenship and foreign labor will seek to buttress the continued institutional influence, if not control, by the state over how Singapore society defines itself in key facets of life. In particular, there is a bifurcated regime resulting in differentiated rights of women living in Singapore, reflecting the state’s ideological drivers on family, citizenship, ethnic identities. The intent is also to pre-empt their becoming a site for contestation over rights, privileges and belonging in a city-state that wants to be a nation-state and a global city.


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Date posted: March 19, 2015  

Suggested Citation

Tan, Eugene Kheng Boon, Troublesome Women and the Nanny State: Drawing Boundaries and Legislating Bifurcated Belonging in Patriarchal Singapore (September 1, 2014). Intersections: Gender and Sexuality in Asia and the Pacific, Issue 36, September 2014; Singapore Management University School of Law Research Paper No. 45/2015. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2579476

Contact Information

Eugene Kheng Boon Tan (Contact Author)
Singapore Management University - School of Law ( email )
60, Stamford Road
Level 4
Singapore, 178900
Singapore

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