Earned Sovereignty Revisited: Creating a Strategic Framework for Managing Self-Determination Based Conflicts

27 Pages Posted: 20 Mar 2015 Last revised: 18 Jun 2015

See all articles by Paul R. Williams

Paul R. Williams

Public International Law & Policy Group; American University

Abigail Avoryie

Public International Law & Policy Group

Carlie Armstrong

Public International Law & Policy Group

Date Written: March 18, 2015

Abstract

There are over seventy active self-determination movements around the globe, and this trend seems far from dissipating. Many of these self-determination movements generate sovereignty-based conflicts characterized by extreme violence on the part of both the parent state and the sub-state entity, and by the potential for regional and international instability.

In order to successfully resolve the persistent and growing number of violent and non-violent sovereignty-based conflicts, this article calls for the international community to develop a strategic framework to guide resolution of these conflicts. Currently, no comprehensive strategic framework for managing self-determination exists. The status quo promotes a nebulous approach to managing self-determination movements, ultimately fostering an atmosphere of apprehension, instability and uncertainty at the mere mention of potential independence.

Keywords: self-determination, sovereignty, independence, transitional justice, referendum, earned sovereignty

Suggested Citation

Williams, Paul R. and Avoryie, Abigail and Armstrong, Carlie, Earned Sovereignty Revisited: Creating a Strategic Framework for Managing Self-Determination Based Conflicts (March 18, 2015). ILSA Journal of International & Comparative Law, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2015, American University, WCL Research Paper No. 2015-9, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2580235 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2580235

Paul R. Williams (Contact Author)

Public International Law & Policy Group ( email )

HOME PAGE: http://www.pilpg.org

American University ( email )

4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20016
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Abigail Avoryie

Public International Law & Policy Group ( email )

888 16th Street NW
Suite 831
Washington DC, DC 20006
United States

Carlie Armstrong

Public International Law & Policy Group ( email )

888 16th Street NW
Suite 831
Washington DC, DC 20006
United States

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