Collective Memory and Planning: The Continuing Legacy of Urban Renewal in Asheville, NC

Journal of Planning History published online 4 November 2014

23 Pages Posted: 20 Mar 2015

See all articles by J. Rosie Tighe

J. Rosie Tighe

Cleveland State University

Timothy Opelt

Appalachian State University

Date Written: June 18, 2014

Abstract

Urban renewal may be the most universally vilified program in planning history, remembered primarily for its destruction of established, central, urban neighborhoods along with the construction of isolated, peripheral, housing projects. This article analyzes how urban renewal unfolded in Asheville, how people perceive the injustices associated with urban renewal, and the legacy that urban renewal programs undertaken by the city of Asheville may have on future planning efforts. By investigating the policy intentions, implementation style, and community participation efforts of the urban renewal projects undertaken during the 1960s and 1970s in the East Riverside neighborhood, this narrative explores how perceived and real missteps during that period continue to affect planners and policy makers today.

Keywords: urban renewal, race, inequality

Suggested Citation

Tighe, J. Rosie and Opelt, Timothy, Collective Memory and Planning: The Continuing Legacy of Urban Renewal in Asheville, NC (June 18, 2014). Journal of Planning History published online 4 November 2014, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2580360

J. Rosie Tighe (Contact Author)

Cleveland State University ( email )

1717 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44115
United States

Timothy Opelt

Appalachian State University

Boone, NC 28608
United States

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