Gender Differences in the Effect of Residential Segregation on Workplace Segregation Among Newly Arrived Immigrants

19 Pages Posted: 6 Apr 2015

See all articles by Tiit Tammaru

Tiit Tammaru

University of Tartu

Magnus Strömgren

University of Umea

Maarten van Ham

Delft University of Technology - OTB Research Institute for Housing, Urban and Mobility Studies; University of St. Andrews; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Alexander M. Danzer

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) - Faculty of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Abstract

Contemporary cities are becoming more and more diverse in population as a result of immigration. Research also shows that within cities residential neighborhoods are becoming ethnically more diverse, but that residential segregation has remained persistently high. High levels of segregation are often seen as negative, preventing integration of immigrants in their host society and having a negative impact on people's lives. Segregation research often focuses on residential neighborhoods, but ignores the fact that a lot of interaction also takes place in other spheres of life, such as the workplace. This paper examines the role of residential segregation in workplace segregation among recently arrived immigrants. By using unique longitudinal register data from Sweden, we show that the role of residential segregation in workplace segregation differs in an important way for immigrant men and immigrant women.

Keywords: immigrants, residential segregation, workplace segregation, longitudinal analysis, Sweden

JEL Classification: J15, J61, R23

Suggested Citation

Tammaru, Tiit and Strömgren, Magnus and van Ham, Maarten and Danzer, Alexander M., Gender Differences in the Effect of Residential Segregation on Workplace Segregation Among Newly Arrived Immigrants. IZA Discussion Paper No. 8932, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2589774

Tiit Tammaru (Contact Author)

University of Tartu ( email )

Magnus Strömgren

University of Umea ( email )

Maarten Van Ham

Delft University of Technology - OTB Research Institute for Housing, Urban and Mobility Studies ( email )

P.O. Box 5043
2600 GA Delft
Netherlands
+31 15 278 2782 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.maartenvanham.nl

University of St. Andrews ( email )

North St
Saint Andrews, Fife KY16 9AJ
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Alexander M. Danzer

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) - Faculty of Economics ( email )

Ludwigstrasse 28
Munich, D-80539
Germany

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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