The Growing Segmentation of the Charter School Sector in North Carolina

48 Pages Posted: 13 Apr 2015 Last revised: 6 Aug 2022

See all articles by Helen F. Ladd

Helen F. Ladd

Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy

Charles T. Clotfelter

Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy; Duke University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

John Holbein

University of Virginia

Date Written: April 2015

Abstract

A defining characteristic of charter schools is that they introduce a strong market element into public education. In this paper, we examine the evolution of the charter school sector in North Carolina between 1999 and 2012 through the lens of a market model. We examine trends in the mix of students enrolled in charter schools, the racial imbalance of charter schools, the quality of the match between parental preferences in charter schools relative to the quality of match in traditional public schools, and the distribution of test score performance across charter schools relative those in traditional public schools serving similar students over time. Taken together, our findings imply that the charter schools in North Carolina are increasingly serving the interests of relatively able white students in racially imbalanced schools.

Suggested Citation

Ladd, Helen F. and Clotfelter, Charles T. and Holbein, John, The Growing Segmentation of the Charter School Sector in North Carolina (April 2015). NBER Working Paper No. w21078, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2593657

Helen F. Ladd (Contact Author)

Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy ( email )

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Charles T. Clotfelter

Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy ( email )

Box 90245
Durham, NC 27708
United States
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Duke University - Department of Economics

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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John Holbein

University of Virginia ( email )

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22903 (Fax)

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