Halo Effects in Social Media: Do Product Recalls Hurt or Help Rival Brands

111 Pages Posted: 22 Apr 2015 Last revised: 23 Apr 2015

Abhishek Borah

University of Washington - Michael G. Foster School of Business

Gerard J. Tellis

University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business, Department of Marketing

Date Written: April 20, 2015

Abstract

Online chatter is important because it is spontaneous, passionate, information rich, granular, and live. Thus, it can forewarn and be diagnostic about potential problems with automobile models, known as nameplates. The authors define perverse halo as the phenomenon whereby negative chatter about one nameplate increases negative chatter for another nameplate. The authors test the existence of such perverse halo for 48 nameplates from 4 different brands during a series of automobile recalls. The analysis is by individual and panel Vector AutoRegressive models.

Perverse halo is extensive. It occurs for nameplates within the same brand across segments and across brands within segments. It is strongest between brands of the same country. Perverse halo is asymmetric, being stronger from a dominant brand to a less dominant brand than vice versa. These halo effects have a short wear-in and a modest wear-out. Recall related advertising has harmful effects on both the recalled brand and its rivals. Further, these halo effects impact downstream performance metrics such as sales and stock market performance.

Keywords: Halo; Perverse Halo; Online Chatter; Product Recalls; Vector Autoregressive Models; Upward Halo; Downward Halo; Panel Vector AutoRegressive Models; Dynamic Responses

Suggested Citation

Borah, Abhishek and Tellis, Gerard J., Halo Effects in Social Media: Do Product Recalls Hurt or Help Rival Brands (April 20, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2596921 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2596921

Abhishek Borah

University of Washington - Michael G. Foster School of Business ( email )

Box 353200
Seattle, WA 98195-3200
United States

Gerard J. Tellis (Contact Author)

University of Southern California - Marshall School of Business, Department of Marketing ( email )

Hoffman Hall 701
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0443
United States
213-740-5031 (Phone)
213-740-7828 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://gtellis.net

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