Food Reformulation and the (Neo)-Liberal State: New Strategies for Strengthening Voluntary Salt Reduction Programs in the UK and USA

Public Health, Vol. 129, No. 8, pp. 1061-1073, 2015

Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 15/29

14 Pages Posted: 23 Apr 2015 Last revised: 18 Sep 2015

See all articles by Belinda Reeve

Belinda Reeve

The University of Sydney Law School

Roger Magnusson

The University of Sydney Law School

Date Written: April 23, 2015

Abstract

Globally, excess salt intake is a significant cause of preventable heart disease and stroke, given the established links between high salt intake, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease. This paper describes and evaluates the voluntary approaches to salt reduction that operate in the United Kingdom and the United States, and proposes a new strategy for improving their performance. Drawing on developments in the theory and practice of public health governance, as well as theoretical ideas from the field of regulatory studies, this paper proposes a responsive regulatory model for managing food reformulation initiatives, including salt reduction programs. This model provides a transparent framework for guiding industry behavior, making full use of industry's willingness to participate in efforts to create healthier products, but using ‘legislative scaffolding’ to escalate from self-regulation towards co-regulation if industry fails to play its part in achieving national goals and targets.

Keywords: Salt reduction, Food reformulation, UK, US, Regulation, Law, Non-communicable diseases

JEL Classification: K10, K30, K32

Suggested Citation

Reeve, Belinda and Magnusson, Roger, Food Reformulation and the (Neo)-Liberal State: New Strategies for Strengthening Voluntary Salt Reduction Programs in the UK and USA (April 23, 2015). Public Health, Vol. 129, No. 8, pp. 1061-1073, 2015, Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 15/29, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2597932

Belinda Reeve (Contact Author)

The University of Sydney Law School ( email )

New Law Building, F10
The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia

Roger Magnusson

The University of Sydney Law School ( email )

New Law Building, F10
The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia

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