The Local Socioeconomic Effects of Gold Mining: Evidence from Ghana

47 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2016 Last revised: 1 Aug 2019

See all articles by Punam Chuhan-Pole

Punam Chuhan-Pole

World Bank

Andrew Dabalen

World Bank - Africa

Andreas Kotsadam

University of Oslo - Department of Economics; Norwegian Social Research

Aly Sanoh

World Bank - Africa

Anja Benshaul-Tolonen

Barnard College - Department of Economics

Anja Karolina Tolonen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: April 23, 2015

Abstract

Ghana is experiencing its third gold rush, and this paper sheds light on the socioeconomic impacts of this rapid expansion in industrial production. The paper uses a rich data set consisting of geocoded household data combined with detailed information on gold mining activities, and conducts two types of difference-in-differences estimations that provide complementary evidence. The first is a local-level analysis that identifies an economic footprint area very close to a mine; the second is a district-level analysis that captures the fiscal channel. The results indicate that men are more likely to benefit from direct employment as miners and that women are more likely to gain from indirect employment opportunities in services, although these results are imprecisely measured. Long-established households gain access to infrastructure, such as electricity and radios. Migrants living close to mines are less likely to have access to electricity and the incidence of diarrheal diseases is higher among migrant children. Overall, however, infant mortality rates decrease significantly in mining communities.

Keywords: Mining & Extractive Industry (Non-Energy), Primary Metals, Reproductive Health, Early Child and Children's Health, Educational Sciences

Suggested Citation

Chuhan-Pole, Punam and Dabalen, Andrew and Kotsadam, Andreas and Sanoh, Aly and Tolonen, Anja and Tolonen, Anja Karolina, The Local Socioeconomic Effects of Gold Mining: Evidence from Ghana (April 23, 2015). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 7250, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2598361

Punam Chuhan-Pole (Contact Author)

World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Andrew Dabalen

World Bank - Africa ( email )

1818 H Street
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Andreas Kotsadam

University of Oslo - Department of Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 1095 Blindern
N-0317 Oslo
Norway

Norwegian Social Research ( email )

Munthesgt. 29, N-0260
Oslo
Norway

Aly Sanoh

World Bank - Africa ( email )

1818 H Street
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Anja Tolonen

Barnard College - Department of Economics ( email )

3009 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

Anja Karolina Tolonen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

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