Assessing the Effects of Self-Regulation -- The Food Pyramid Meets the Regulatory Pyramid: Responsive Regulation of Food Advertising to Children

29 Pages Posted: 2 May 2015 Last revised: 4 May 2015

See all articles by Belinda Reeve

Belinda Reeve

The University of Sydney Law School

Date Written: May 1, 2015

Abstract

This chapter forms part of a thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements of a PhD from the Faculty of Law, University of Sydney.

This chapter describes studies that evaluate the effects of industry self-regulation on Australian television food advertising. After describing the findings of, and limitations in, existing research on the RCMI and QSRI, I propose a different approach to assessing the efficacy of the codes. Thus, the second part of the chapter translates the theory of responsive regulation into practical measures for evaluating regulatory regimes that rely upon voluntary industry action. I describe some of the key determinants of successful self-regulation, with a focus on the design features and institutional supports that are required if private regulation is to advance public policy objectives. The chapter’s overall goal is to create a detailed framework for assessing whether the RCMI and QSRI contain the building blocks of a successful self-regulatory regime.

Keywords: Self-regulation, television food advertising, regulatory theory, responsive regulation

JEL Classification: K10, K30, K32

Suggested Citation

Reeve, Belinda, Assessing the Effects of Self-Regulation -- The Food Pyramid Meets the Regulatory Pyramid: Responsive Regulation of Food Advertising to Children (May 1, 2015). Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 15/36, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2601221

Belinda Reeve (Contact Author)

The University of Sydney Law School ( email )

New Law Building, F10
The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia

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