Is Theorizing Useful in International Law?

2 Pages Posted: 16 May 2015

Date Written: May 14, 2015

Abstract

Papers related to this article can be found at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2606351: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2606348: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2606389

Are we sure that we are not living in some corner of the universe where adding a pair of shoes to another pair of shoes gives us a total of five shoes? If so, we cannot trust any theory, in international law or elsewhere, to help us in our work. Here it is argued that empirical evidence shows an increase in subjective probability (our level of confidence) that a given theory is useful.

Keywords: subjective probability, level of confidence, degree of confidence, Kant, Carnap

JEL Classification: K10, K19, K39

Suggested Citation

D'Amato, Anthony, Is Theorizing Useful in International Law? (May 14, 2015). Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 15-32. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2606362 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2606362

Anthony D'Amato (Contact Author)

Northwestern University - Pritzker School of Law ( email )

375 E. Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL 60611
United States

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