Skill Biased Structural Change

33 Pages Posted: 18 May 2015 Last revised: 30 May 2015

See all articles by Francisco J. Buera

Francisco J. Buera

Washington University in St. Louis; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Joseph P. Kaboski

Ohio State University (OSU) - Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); University of Notre Dame - Department of Economics

Richard Rogerson

Arizona State University (ASU) - Economics Department; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Date Written: May 2015

Abstract

We document for a broad panel of advanced economies that increases in GDP per capita are associated with a shift in the composition of value added to sectors that are intensive in high-skill labor. It follows that further development in these economies leads to an increase in the relative demand for skilled labor. We develop a two-sector model of this process and use it to assess the contribution of this process of skill-biased structural change to the rise of the skill premium in the US, and a broad panel of advanced economies, over the period 1977 to 2005. We find that these compositional demands account for between 25 and 30% of the overall increase of the skill premium due to technical change.

Suggested Citation

Buera, Francisco J. and Kaboski, Joseph P. and Rogerson, Richard, Skill Biased Structural Change (May 2015). NBER Working Paper No. w21165. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2607355

Francisco J. Buera (Contact Author)

Washington University in St. Louis ( email )

One Brookings Drive
Campus Box 1208
Saint Louis, MO MO 63130-4899
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Joseph P. Kaboski

Ohio State University (OSU) - Economics ( email )

410 Arps Hall
1945 N. High St.
Columbus, OH 43210-1172
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

University of Notre Dame - Department of Economics ( email )

Notre Dame, IN 46556
United States

Richard Rogerson

Arizona State University (ASU) - Economics Department ( email )

Tempe, AZ 85287-3806
United States
480-727-6671 (Phone)
602-965-0748 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs ( email )

Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08544-1021
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
23
Abstract Views
414
PlumX Metrics