Finding the 'Self' in Self-Regulation: The Identity-Value Model

85 Pages Posted: 22 Jun 2015  

Elliot Berkman

University of Oregon - Department of Psychology

Jordan L. Livingston

University of Oregon - Department of Psychology

Lauren E. Kahn

University of Oregon - Department of Psychology

Date Written: June 8, 2015

Abstract

The identity-value model (IVM) posits that goal-directed behaviors that are identity-relevant are more likely to be enacted because they have greater subjective value than identity-irrelevant behaviors. The IVM builds upon results from social psychology that aspects of identity (e.g., core values, social identities, personal goals) hold positive value and from behavioral economics that behavior is driven by a subjective value calculation that integrates input from many sources. The IVM is consistent with evidence from neuroscience that value integration and self-processing occur in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. We review related theories, define key constructs, explicate the model, and delineate its boundary conditions. We also present results in the research literature that can be mechanistically explained by the IVM and connected to one another through the construct of subjective value imparted by identity. We close by discussing questions about the model whose answers could advance the study of self-regulation.

Keywords: self-regulation, identity, value, motivation, goals, neuroscience, self-control

Suggested Citation

Berkman, Elliot and Livingston, Jordan L. and Kahn, Lauren E., Finding the 'Self' in Self-Regulation: The Identity-Value Model (June 8, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2621251 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2621251

Elliot T Berkman (Contact Author)

University of Oregon - Department of Psychology ( email )

Eugene, OR 97403
United States
541-346-4909 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://sanlab.uoregon.edu

Jordan L. Livingston

University of Oregon - Department of Psychology ( email )

Eugene, OR 97403
United States

Lauren E. Kahn

University of Oregon - Department of Psychology ( email )

Eugene, OR 97403
United States

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