The Spatial Distribution of Housing-Related Tax Benefits in the United States

Zell-Lurie Real Estate Center at Wharton Working Paper No. 332

69 Pages Posted: 29 Mar 2001

See all articles by Joseph Gyourko

Joseph Gyourko

University of Pennsylvania - Real Estate Department; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Todd M. Sinai

University of Pennsylvania - The Wharton School; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: February 2001

Abstract

Using 1990 Census tract-level data, we estimate how tax subsidies to owner-occupied housing are distributed spatially across the United States, calculating their value as the difference in taxes currently paid by home owners and the taxes owners would pay if there were no preference for investing in one's home relative to other assets. The $164 billion national tax subsidy is highly skewed spatially with a few areas receiving large subsidies and most areas receiving small ones. If the program were self-financed on a lump sum basis, less than 20 percent of states and 10 percent of metropolitan areas would have net positive subsidies. These few metropolitan areas are situated almost exclusively along the California coast and in the Northeast from Washington, DC to Boston. At the state level, California stands out because it receives 25 percent of the national aggregate subsidy flow while being home to only 10 percent of the country's owners. At the metropolitan area level, owners in just three large CMSAs receive over 75 percent of all positive net benefits. And within a number of the larger metropolitan areas, the top quarter of owners receives 70 percent or more of the total subsidy flowing to the metro area.

Keywords: Housing subsidies, taxation, spatial analysis

JEL Classification: H20, R38

Suggested Citation

Gyourko, Joseph E. and Sinai, Todd M., The Spatial Distribution of Housing-Related Tax Benefits in the United States (February 2001). Zell-Lurie Real Estate Center at Wharton Working Paper No. 332, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=262171 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.262171

Joseph E. Gyourko

University of Pennsylvania - Real Estate Department ( email )

Philadelphia, PA 19104-6330
United States
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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Todd M. Sinai (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania - The Wharton School ( email )

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215-573-2220 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://real.wharton.upenn.edu/~sinai

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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