Judicial Appointment and the Skills for Judicial Office

Journal of Judicial Administration, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2005

17 Pages Posted: 27 Jun 2015

See all articles by Sharyn Roach Anleu

Sharyn Roach Anleu

Flinders University - Department of Sociology

Kathy Mack

Flinders University - School of Law

Date Written: 2005

Abstract

Although there is widespread commitment to the principle that judicial appointment must be made on merit, the concept of merit in judicial appointment lacks concrete meaning. At the very least, merit must include the actual qualities and skills needed for the institutional role and specific tasks of the judicial office. The authors' research findings identify elements of the everyday work of Australian magistrates and the specific qualities and skills which are essential or important for the work of judicial officers more widely. This information can be used to develop valid criteria for selection for judicial office rather than relying on a vague and subjective notion of merit.

Keywords: Judiciary, judges, magistrates, courts, Australia, judicial appointment, judicial skills, selection criteria, empirical research, survey research, merit, Australian magistrates

Suggested Citation

Roach Anleu, Sharyn and Mack, Kathy, Judicial Appointment and the Skills for Judicial Office (2005). Journal of Judicial Administration, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2623441

Sharyn Roach Anleu

Flinders University - Department of Sociology ( email )

Adelaide, S.A, 5001
Australia
+61 8 8201 2122 (Phone)
+61 8 8201 3521 (Fax)

Kathy Mack (Contact Author)

Flinders University - School of Law ( email )

Adelaide S.A. 5001
Australia
+08 8201 3627 (Phone)

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