The Work of the Australian Judiciary: Public and Judicial Attitudes

Journal of Judicial Administration, Vol. 20, No. 1, 2010

15 Pages Posted: 27 Jun 2015

See all articles by Sharyn Roach Anleu

Sharyn Roach Anleu

Flinders University - Department of Sociology

Kathy Mack

Flinders University - School of Law

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

Australians place a high value on the importance of courts, though public confidence in the courts and legal system is generally low. Very few Australians have any first-hand experience of their courts, suggesting that most of their information about courts and judges derives from print and electronic news and entertainment or what they are told about the experiences of other people. A disjuncture between the public's high value of courts and low confidence in the justice system can present a profound challenge to Australia's social fabric and its legal integrity. Closer analysis of public attitudes on a range of facets of judicial work generates a more nuanced and complex understanding of public opinion about the justice system.

Keywords: Judiciary, judges, courts, Australia, public attitudes, public confidence, empirical research, survey research, justice system

Suggested Citation

Roach Anleu, Sharyn and Mack, Kathy, The Work of the Australian Judiciary: Public and Judicial Attitudes (2010). Journal of Judicial Administration, Vol. 20, No. 1, 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2623444

Sharyn Roach Anleu

Flinders University - Department of Sociology ( email )

Adelaide, S.A, 5001
Australia
+61 8 8201 2122 (Phone)
+61 8 8201 3521 (Fax)

Kathy Mack (Contact Author)

Flinders University - School of Law ( email )

Adelaide S.A. 5001
Australia
+08 8201 3627 (Phone)

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