The Sensitivity of Consumption to Transitory Income: Estimates from Panel Data on Households

46 Pages Posted: 28 Dec 2002  

Robert E. Hall

Stanford University - The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Frederic S. Mishkin

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: July 1980

Abstract

We investigate the stochastic relation between income and consumption (specifically, consumption of food) within a panel of about 2,000 households. Our major findings are: 1. Consumption responds much more strongly to permanent than to transitory movements of income. 2. The response to transitory income is nonetheless clearly positive. 3. A simple test, independent of our model of consumption, rejects a central implication of the pure life cycle-permanent income hypothesis. The observed covariation of income and consumption is compatible with pure life cycle-permanent income behavior on the part of80 percent of families and simple proportionality of consumption and income among the remaining 20 percent. As a general matter, our findings support the view that families respond differently to different sources of income variations. In particular, temporary income tax policies have smaller effects on consumption than do other, more permanent changes in income of the same magnitude.

Suggested Citation

Hall, Robert E. and Mishkin, Frederic S., The Sensitivity of Consumption to Transitory Income: Estimates from Panel Data on Households (July 1980). NBER Working Paper No. w0505. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=263387

Robert E. Hall (Contact Author)

Stanford University - The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305-6010
United States
650-723-2215 (Phone)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
650-723-2215 (Phone)

Frederic S. Mishkin

Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics ( email )

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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