Exploring Older and Younger Adults’ Preferences for Health Information and Participation in Decision-Making Using the Health Information Wants Questionnaire (HIWQ)

Health Expectations, 17, pp.795–808

14 Pages Posted: 5 Aug 2015

See all articles by Xie Bo

Xie Bo

University of Texas at Austin

Mo Wang

University of Florida - Department of Management

Robert Feldman

Independent

Le Zhou

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Carlson School of Management

Date Written: May 2012

Abstract

Context: Existing measurements of patient preferences cover only a limited range of health information and participation in decision making. A broader approach is necessary to understand the breadth and variations in patient preferences.

Objective: To explore the breadth and variances in patient preferences for health information and participation in decision making and to understand the relationship between age and each type of preference.

Design: The Health Information Wants Questionnaire (HIWQ) was administered during May-December 2010 to gather data about the information and corresponding decision-making autonomy participants would want in seven areas: diagnosis, treatment, laboratory tests, self-care, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), psychosocial factors and health-care providers.

Setting: A large state university, public libraries and senior centres in Maryland, USA. Participants: A convenience sample of 438 individuals, including 226 undergraduates (mean age = 20; SD = 2.15) and 212 community-dwelling older adults (mean age = 72; SD = 9.00).

Main Outcome Measures: Ratings on the information and decision-making items of the HIWQ.

Results: Participants expressed higher levels of preference for information than for participation in decision making on six of seven subscales. On the psychosocial subscale, they expressed stronger desire for participation in decision making than for information. Age had no predictive effect on the overall preferences or specific preferences for information and participation in decision making about standard treatments and CAM. The predictive effect of age on the other types of preferences varied significantly.

Conclusions: Physicians should take into account the breadth and variations in patient preferences. The predictive effect of age on patient preferences varied depending on the specific area of preferences.

Suggested Citation

Bo, Xie and Wang, Mo and Feldman, Robert and Zhou, Le, Exploring Older and Younger Adults’ Preferences for Health Information and Participation in Decision-Making Using the Health Information Wants Questionnaire (HIWQ) (May 2012). Health Expectations, 17, pp.795–808. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2639256

Xie Bo

University of Texas at Austin ( email )

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

Mo Wang (Contact Author)

University of Florida - Department of Management ( email )

United States

Robert Feldman

Independent

No Address Available

Le Zhou

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Carlson School of Management ( email )

19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States

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