Decembrist Revolt (1825), the Marshall Plan (1947-1951), and Feminism -- The Programs that Were Less than What They Could Have Been

Posted: 27 Aug 2015 Last revised: 20 Jun 2019

See all articles by Magdalena Laskowska

Magdalena Laskowska

Université Paris II - Panthéon-Assas

Date Written: August 26, 2015

Abstract

My paper retraces the Decembrist Revolt (1825) in Russia, and asks certain fundamental questions regarding this revolution and its political potential if the Western countries (or other countries) had properly replied to it – the questions that have not yet been seriously answered. I also raise the topic of the Marshall Plan (1947-1951), and what it could have been for Central Europe and the Western world. Finally, I succinctly analyze feminism as perpetuum mobile, and point to Simone de Beauvoir as the pioneer of modern feminism – at least she should be so owing to her great contribution to the social debate in The Second Sex.

Keywords: Decembrist Revolt, 1825, the MArshall Plan, Feminism

Suggested Citation

Laskowska, Magdalena, Decembrist Revolt (1825), the Marshall Plan (1947-1951), and Feminism -- The Programs that Were Less than What They Could Have Been (August 26, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2651042

Magdalena Laskowska (Contact Author)

Université Paris II - Panthéon-Assas ( email )

12 place du Pantheon
Paris cedex 06, 75231
France

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