Does Apologizing Work? An Empirical Test of the Conventional Wisdom

19 Pages Posted: 8 Sep 2015  

Richard Hanania

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Department of Political Science, Students

Date Written: September 1, 2015

Abstract

Politicians and other public figures often apologize after making controversial statements. While it is assumed that they are wise to do so, this proposition has yet to be tested empirically. There are reasons to believe that apologizing makes public figures appear weak and risk averse, which may make them less attractive as people and lead members of the public to want to punish them. This paper presents the results of an experiment where respondents were given two versions of two real-life controversies involving comments made by public figures. Approximately half of the participants read a story that made it appear as if the person had apologized, while the rest were led to believe that the individual stood firm. In the first experiment, involving Rand Paul and his comments on the Civil Rights Act, hearing that he was apologetic did not change whether respondents were less likely to vote for him. When presented with two versions of the controversy surrounding Larry Summers and his comments about women scientists and engineers, however, liberals and females were much more likely to say that he definitely or probably should have faced negative consequences for his statement when presented with his apology. The effects on other groups were smaller or neutral. Overall, the evidence suggests that when a prominent figure apologizes for a controversial statement, the public is either unaffected or becomes more likely to desire that the individual be punished.

Keywords: Political psychology, polling, evolutionary psychology, pundits, public opinion, Donal Trump, political science

Suggested Citation

Hanania, Richard, Does Apologizing Work? An Empirical Test of the Conventional Wisdom (September 1, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2654465 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2654465

Richard Hanania (Contact Author)

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Department of Political Science, Students ( email )

Los Angeles, CA
United States

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