The Environmental and Social Injustice of Farmworker Pesticide Exposure

29 Pages Posted: 4 Sep 2015

See all articles by Joan Flocks

Joan Flocks

University of Florida - Fredric G. Levin College of Law - Center for Governmental Responsibility

Date Written: January 1, 2012

Abstract

The premise of this Article is that social, economic, and political factors interact in a way that ensures that farmworkers continue to lack participation in decision-making in pesticide regulation, that disproportionate health impacts are perpetuated, and that changing the status quo is difficult. Farmworkers have had little success in addressing harmful occupational pesticide exposure using methods that some environmental justice communities have employed, i.e., lobbying for effective regulation, engaging in public demonstration, or pursuing traditional litigation.7 In order to find appropriately tailored remedies for this particular environmental injustice, it is important to recognize that disproportionate pesticide exposure has less to do with a particular framework of regulation and more to do with underlying social and economic forces.

Suggested Citation

Flocks, Joan, The Environmental and Social Injustice of Farmworker Pesticide Exposure (January 1, 2012). Georgetown Journal on Poverty Law Policy, Vol. XIX, No. 2, Spring 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2655002

Joan Flocks (Contact Author)

University of Florida - Fredric G. Levin College of Law - Center for Governmental Responsibility ( email )

P.O. Box 117629
Gainesville, FL 32611-7629
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
46
Abstract Views
570
PlumX Metrics