Is the Real Estate Sector More Responsive to Economy-Wide or Housing Market Conditions? An Exploratory Analysis

Posted: 23 Sep 2015

See all articles by Laurie Bates

Laurie Bates

Bryant University

Carmelo Giaccotto

University of Connecticut - Department of Finance

Rexford E. Santerre

University of Connecticut - Department of Finance

Date Written: September 22, 2015

Abstract

This paper examines if the real estate economy, measured in various ways, is more responsive to conditions in the macroeconomy or the housing market at the state level. Total gross state product (GSP) and housing value serve as indicators of the conditions in the overall economy and housing market, respectively. The empirical findings, resulting from a panel data set of U.S. states over the period from 1997 to 2010, yield a number of interesting insights. First, descriptive statistics show that the real estate economy comprises over 10 percent of the typical state economy. Thus, a strong and healthy real estate economy is vital for a state macroeconomy to prosper. Second, and not surprisingly, descriptive statistics also reveal that real estate GSP, employment, and wages fluctuated wildly over the 13-year period largely due to the Great Recession. Third, vector error correction modeling finds that a strong causal relationship exists between the macroeconomy and real estate economy in the long run. In addition, the results indicate that the effects of the state macroeconomy on the real estate economy are less cyclical and more immediate in the short run than those from the housing market.

Keywords: Real estate sector growth; Granger causality; Vector error correction model

Suggested Citation

Bates, Laurie and Giaccotto, Carmelo and Santerre, Rexford E., Is the Real Estate Sector More Responsive to Economy-Wide or Housing Market Conditions? An Exploratory Analysis (September 22, 2015). Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Vol. 51, No. 4, 2015. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2664232

Laurie Bates

Bryant University ( email )

1150 Douglas Pike
Smithfield, RI 02917-1284
United States

Carmelo Giaccotto

University of Connecticut - Department of Finance ( email )

School of Business
2100 Hillside Road
Storrs, CT 06269
United States
202-486-4360 (Phone)
202-486-0349 (Fax)

Rexford E. Santerre (Contact Author)

University of Connecticut - Department of Finance ( email )

School of Business
2100 Hillside Road
Storrs, CT 06269
United States

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