Frozen in Time: A Fresh Look at the Law of the Sea and Why the United States Continues to Fight Against It

42.1 S.U. L. Rev. 143 (2014)

19 Pages Posted: 1 Oct 2015 Last revised: 16 Oct 2015

See all articles by James Brousseau

James Brousseau

Louisiana State University, Paul M. Hebert Law Center

Date Written: April 15, 2015

Abstract

The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea ("UNCLOS") has been a contentious issue for the United States since its entry into force in 1982. Currently there are 167 State Parties to the Convention, yet the United States remains on the outside looking in. As Russia expands its Arctic activities and deep seabed mining becomes economically feasible, many are wondering what features of the treaty continue to prevent the United States from joining? By analyzing the latest round of Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearings on UNCLOS accession, this article examines this question.

Keywords: UNCLOS, Law of the Sea, International Law, United States, treaty, ratification

JEL Classification: K33, Q48

Suggested Citation

Brousseau, James, Frozen in Time: A Fresh Look at the Law of the Sea and Why the United States Continues to Fight Against It (April 15, 2015). 42.1 S.U. L. Rev. 143 (2014). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2667035

James Brousseau (Contact Author)

Louisiana State University, Paul M. Hebert Law Center ( email )

No Address Available, LA 70803
United States

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