In Whose Name? The ICC and the Search for Constituency

"In Whose Name? The ICC and the Search for Constituency", in Carsten Stahn, Sarah Kendall and Christian M. de Vos, Contested Justice: The Politics and Practice of International Criminal Court Interventions, Cambridge University Press (2015).

17 Pages Posted: 6 Oct 2015

See all articles by Frederic Megret

Frederic Megret

McGill University - Faculty of Law

Date Written: July 2, 2004

Abstract

This chapter examines in whose name international criminal justice is imagined as being rendered for. Its goal is to develop an understanding of the symbolic authority of the ICC by looking at the Court's own discursive and rhetorical practices of promotion. It is suggested that the Court alternatives between a view of its ideal recipients ("Humanity," the "international community"), and the need to periodically acknowledge who its real patrons are (certain states). The Court's "local turn" (societies, communities) is a way of avoiding this dilemma and anchoring the legitimacy of international criminal justice in the concrete yet sacred suffering of victims.

Keywords: International criminal court; victims; legitimacy

Suggested Citation

Mégret, Frédéric, In Whose Name? The ICC and the Search for Constituency (July 2, 2004). "In Whose Name? The ICC and the Search for Constituency", in Carsten Stahn, Sarah Kendall and Christian M. de Vos, Contested Justice: The Politics and Practice of International Criminal Court Interventions, Cambridge University Press (2015).. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2668601

Frédéric Mégret (Contact Author)

McGill University - Faculty of Law ( email )

3644 Peel Street
Montreal H3A 1W9, Quebec
Canada

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