The ’73 Graft: Punishment, Political Economy, and the Genealogy of Morals

19 Pages Posted: 13 Oct 2015

See all articles by Bernard E. Harcourt

Bernard E. Harcourt

Columbia University; Columbia University

Date Written: October 12, 2015

Abstract

In this essay, I explore the place of a genealogy of morals within the context of a history of political economy. More specifically, I investigate the types of moralization — of criminals and delinquents, of the disorderly, but also of political economic systems, of workers and managers, of rules and rule-breaking — that are necessary and integral to making a population accept new styles of political and economic governance, especially the punitive institutions that accompany modern political economies in the contemporary period.

The marriage of political economy and a genealogy of morals: this essay explores how the moralization of certain groups of people has been necessary to render tolerable the great American paradox of laissez-faire and mass incarceration. How, in effect, practices of moralization are necessary to make tolerable the intolerable.

Keywords: Punishment, political economy, genealogy of morals, Weber, Nietzsche, Foucault, Quesnay, The Punitive Society, The Illusion of Free Markets

Suggested Citation

Harcourt, Bernard E., The ’73 Graft: Punishment, Political Economy, and the Genealogy of Morals (October 12, 2015). Columbia Public Law Research Paper No. 14-485. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2673062

Bernard E. Harcourt (Contact Author)

Columbia University ( email )

Jerome Green Hall, Room 515
435 West 116th Street
New York, NY 10027
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.columbia.edu/fac/Bernard_Harcourt

Columbia University ( email )

7th Floor, International Affairs Bldg.
420 W. 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
United States

HOME PAGE: http://polisci.columbia.edu/people/profile/1685

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
157
rank
183,172
Abstract Views
662
PlumX Metrics