Moral Judgments, Expressive Functions, and Bias in Immigration Law

17 Pages Posted: 13 Oct 2015 Last revised: 4 Jan 2017

See all articles by Emily Ryo

Emily Ryo

University of Southern California Gould School of Law

Date Written: October 13, 2015

Abstract

In a lucid and trenchant style characteristic of Professor Hiroshi Motomura’s writing, "Immigration Outside the Law" offers rich descriptive and prescriptive analyses of three major themes underlying debates about unauthorized migration: the meaning of unlawful presence, state and local involvement in the regulation of unauthorized migration, and the integration of unauthorized migrants into American society. This review advances several ideas that I argue are important to understanding these key themes. In brief, I suggest that a more comprehensive understanding of public debates about unauthorized migration requires examining lay moral judgments about unlawful presence, the expressive functions of immigration law, and the nature of contemporary forms of racial and ethnic bias against Latinos. I discuss how considering these ideas in connection with the book’s key themes and arguments might extend, strengthen, and complicate the book’s analysis and insights.

Suggested Citation

Ryo, Emily, Moral Judgments, Expressive Functions, and Bias in Immigration Law (October 13, 2015). Immigration and Nationality Law Review (2016), Forthcoming, USC Legal Studies Research Papers Series No. 15-33, USC CLASS Research Paper No. CLASS15-31, Criminal Justice, Borders and Citizenship Research Paper No. 2673394, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2673394 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2673394

Emily Ryo (Contact Author)

University of Southern California Gould School of Law ( email )

699 Exposition Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

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