The Last Imagery of Dixie: Explaining Support the Confederate Flag in the Age of Obama

Posted: 15 Oct 2015 Last revised: 27 Oct 2015

See all articles by Emmitt Y. Riley

Emmitt Y. Riley

DePauw University

Brittany Gray

Clark Atlanta University

Date Written: October 13, 2015

Abstract

The church shooting at the historic Mother Emmanuel Church in Charleston South Carolina has sparked a reemergence of the debate over the appropriateness of the Confederate flag. This paper seeks to examine what explains support for Confederate flag in the age of Obama. Previous research has linked support for the Confederate flag to symbolic racism, regional loyalty, and conservatism. At the backdrop of the flag debate is whether or not support for the Confederate flag is a function of racism or southern heritage. Scholars examining support for the Confederate flag have primarily relied on white respondents thereby treating blacks as if they are a monolithic group (Orey 2004; Orey 2011 and Cooper and Knotts 2006). By failing to examine black attitudes towards the Confederate flag scholars have created a significant void within the academic literature. This paper will seek to fill this void by examining the attitudes of blacks and whites. To examining these attitudes, I utilize a representative sample of whites and blacks from two universities in the South and one Midwestern university.

Keywords: Confederate Flag, White Attitudes, Black Attitudes, Racial Identity

Suggested Citation

Riley, Emmitt Y. and Gray, Brittany, The Last Imagery of Dixie: Explaining Support the Confederate Flag in the Age of Obama (October 13, 2015). 2016 National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS) Annual Meeting. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2673675

Emmitt Y. Riley (Contact Author)

DePauw University ( email )

Greencastle, IN 46135
United States
6623920876 (Phone)

Brittany Gray

Clark Atlanta University ( email )

223 James P. Brawley
Atlanta, GA 30314
United States

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