Banishing Solitary: Litigating an End to the Solitary Confinement of Children in Jails and Prisons

45 Pages Posted: 3 Nov 2015 Last revised: 6 Apr 2017

Ian M. Kysel

ACLU of Southern California

Date Written: November 2, 2015

Abstract

The solitary confinement of children is remarkably commonplace in the United States, with the best available government data suggesting that thousands of children across the country are subjected to the practice each year. Physical and social isolation of 22 to 24 hours per day for one day or more, the generally accepted definition of solitary confinement, is used by juvenile detention facilities as well as adult jails and prisons to protect, punish and manage children held there. The practice is neither explicitly banned nor directly regulated by federal law. Yet there is a broad consensus that the practice places children at great risk of permanent physical and mental harm and even death, and that it violates international human rights law. Policymakers and judges in the U.S. are beginning to reevaluate the treatment of children in the adult criminal justice system, drawing from new insights and old intuitions about the developmental differences between children and adults. This welcome trend has only recently begun to translate into any systematic change to the practice of subjecting children to solitary confinement in adult jails or prisons, with significant reform in New York City at the leading edge. Despite the beginnings of a trend, there have been few legal challenges to the solitary confinement of children and there is a consequent dearth of jurisprudence to guide advocates and attorneys seeking to protect children in adult facilities from its attendant harms through litigation – or policymakers seeking to prevent or eliminate unconstitutional conduct. This article helps bridge this significant gap. It contributes the first comprehensive account of the application of federal constitutional and statutory frameworks to the solitary confinement of children in adult jails and prisons, with reference to relevant international law as well as medical and correctional standards. In doing so, this article seeks to lay the groundwork for litigation promoting an end to this practice.

Suggested Citation

Kysel, Ian M., Banishing Solitary: Litigating an End to the Solitary Confinement of Children in Jails and Prisons (November 2, 2015). New York University Review of Law & Social Change, Vol. 40. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2685112

Ian M. Kysel (Contact Author)

ACLU of Southern California ( email )

125 Broad Street
New York, NY 10004
United States

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