Medium Term Educational Consequences of Alternative Conditional Cash Transfer Designs: Experimental Evidence from Colombia

39 Pages Posted: 17 Nov 2015

See all articles by Felipe Barrera-Osorio

Felipe Barrera-Osorio

Harvard University - Harvard Graduate School of Education

Leigh L. Linden

The University of Texas at Austin; National Bureau of Economic Research; Jameel Poverty Action Lab; Innovations for Poverty Action; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD)

Juan Saavedra

University of Southern California - Department of Economics; Center for Economic and Social Research (CESR)

Date Written: October 2015

Abstract

We show that three Colombian conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs for secondary school improve educational outcomes after eight years, depending on the stipend structure. Forcing families to save a portion of the transfers until they make enrollment decisions for the next year increases on-time enrollment in secondary school, reduces dropout rates, and promotes tertiary enrollment. Traditional stipends improve on-time enrollment and high school exit exam completion rates. These differences between stipends are statistically significant due to the effects on older students. Finally, a stipend that directly incentivizes tertiary enrollment promotes on-time enrollment in secondary school and in lower quality tertiary institutions.

Keywords: Conditional Cash Transfer, Medium term effects, tertiary education, randomized controlled trial, Bogota Colombia

JEL Classification: C93, I21, I38

Suggested Citation

Barrera-Osorio, Felipe and Linden, Leigh L. and Saavedra, Juan, Medium Term Educational Consequences of Alternative Conditional Cash Transfer Designs: Experimental Evidence from Colombia (October 2015). CESR-Schaeffer Working Paper No. 2015-026. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2688674 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2688674

Felipe Barrera-Osorio

Harvard University - Harvard Graduate School of Education ( email )

456 Gutman Library
6 appian way
cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Leigh L. Linden

The University of Texas at Austin ( email )

Austin, TX 78712
United States
+1 (512) 475-8556 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.leighlinden.com

National Bureau of Economic Research ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.leighlinden.com

Jameel Poverty Action Lab ( email )

30 Wadsworth Street, E53-320
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02142
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.leighlinden.com

Innovations for Poverty Action ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://www.leighlinden.com

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) ( email )

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD) ( email )

Duke University
Durham, NC 90097
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.leighlinden.com

Juan Saavedra (Contact Author)

University of Southern California - Department of Economics ( email )

3620 South Vermont Ave. Kaprielian (KAP) Hall, 300
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

Center for Economic and Social Research (CESR)

635 Downey Way
Los Angeles, CA 90089-3332
United States

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