Relationship between Information Communications Technology, Economic Growth and Carbon Emissions: Evidence from Panel Analysis of the G20

Global Business and Economics Review, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 35–50. DOI: 10.1504/GBER.2015.066530

Posted: 15 Nov 2015 Last revised: 22 Dec 2017

See all articles by Jung Wan Lee

Jung Wan Lee

Boston University - Department of Administrative Sciences

Kip Becker

Boston University - Department of Administrative Sciences

Date Written: January 1, 2015

Abstract

The paper deals with the contribution of information and communications technology (ICT) to economic growth and environmental sustainability by examining the long-run equilibrium relationships between ICT, carbon emissions and economic growth. The paper employs cointegration techniques, fixed-effects and random-effects models for panel data of the G20 countries from 1991 to 2010. The test results indicate that a long-run equilibrium relationship exists among these variables. In testing short-run relationship, ICT has been an important contributor to economic growth while the role of ICT as an important contributor to carbon emissions has been marginalized in advanced economies over the past two decades. In rapidly developing economies, ICT has also been an important contributor to economic growth while ICT is associated with a large increase in carbon emissions.

Keywords: economic growth, information communications technology, environmental sustainability, carbon emissions

JEL Classification: O41, O44, Q55, Q56, Q58

Suggested Citation

Lee, Jung Wan and Becker, Kip, Relationship between Information Communications Technology, Economic Growth and Carbon Emissions: Evidence from Panel Analysis of the G20 (January 1, 2015). Global Business and Economics Review, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 35–50. DOI: 10.1504/GBER.2015.066530 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2690443

Jung Wan Lee (Contact Author)

Boston University - Department of Administrative Sciences ( email )

808 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
United States
617 358 5627 (Phone)
617 353 6840 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.bu.edu/met

Kip Becker

Boston University - Department of Administrative Sciences ( email )

United States

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