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Concept Creep: Psychology's Expanding Concepts of Harm and Pathology

Haslam, N., Concept creep: Psychology's expanding concepts of harm and pathology. Psychological Inquiry, Forthcoming

52 Pages Posted: 15 Nov 2015  

Nick Haslam

University of Melbourne - School of Psychological Sciences

Date Written: November 14, 2015

Abstract

Many of psychology’s concepts have undergone semantic shifts in recent years. These conceptual changes follow a consistent trend. Concepts that refer to the negative aspects of human experience and behavior have expanded their meanings so that they now encompass a much broader range of phenomena than before. This expansion takes ‘horizontal’ and ‘vertical’ forms: concepts extend outward to capture qualitatively new phenomena and downward to capture quantitatively less extreme phenomena. The concepts of abuse, bullying, trauma, mental disorder, addiction, and prejudice are examined to illustrate these historical changes. In each case, the concept’s boundary has stretched and its meaning has dilated. A variety of explanations for this pattern of ‘concept creep’ are considered and its implications are explored. I contend that the expansion primarily reflects an ever-increasing sensitivity to harm, reflecting a liberal moral agenda. Its implications are ambivalent, however. Although conceptual change is inevitable and often well motivated, concept creep runs the risk of pathologizing everyday experience and encouraging a sense of virtuous but impotent victimhood.

Suggested Citation

Haslam, Nick, Concept Creep: Psychology's Expanding Concepts of Harm and Pathology (November 14, 2015). Haslam, N., Concept creep: Psychology's expanding concepts of harm and pathology. Psychological Inquiry, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2690955

Nick Haslam (Contact Author)

University of Melbourne - School of Psychological Sciences ( email )

Parkville, Victoria
Australia

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