Consumer Responses to Product Placement in Television Sitcoms: Genre, Sex, and Consumption

Consumption, Markets and Culture, 7 (4), 373-396, 2004

Posted: 18 Nov 2015

See all articles by Barbara Stern

Barbara Stern

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick/Piscataway

Cristel Russell

American University - Kogod School of Business

Date Written: 2004

Abstract

The paper presents a study of consumer responses to products placed in a sitcom, “Ads R’ Us,” created as a stimulus to ascertain the influence of a television program’s genre and male/female respondents’ sex on responses. Textual analysis is used to analyze sitcoms, a category of programs created in accordance with genre conventions, the structural framework that influences responses to media vehicles. First-generation feminist reading theory, which challenged the patriarchal assumptions mostly unquestioned in the US until the early 1960s, is used to analyze responses produced by second-generation respondents, who came of age a generation later, after the women’s liberation movement led to socio-cultural changes. The study draws from multidisciplinary theory and integrates stimulus-side/response-side research to enhance understanding of the text-context-consumer relationship. Findings indicate that second-generation responses to placed products are problematized by the coexistence of patriarchal and feminist perspectives that color male/female readings of sitcoms.

Suggested Citation

Stern, Barbara and Russell, Cristel, Consumer Responses to Product Placement in Television Sitcoms: Genre, Sex, and Consumption (2004). Consumption, Markets and Culture, 7 (4), 373-396, 2004. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2691663

Barbara Stern

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick/Piscataway

94 Rockafeller Road
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
United States

Cristel Russell (Contact Author)

American University - Kogod School of Business ( email )

4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20816-8044
United States

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