Realistically Fake: Self-Reflexive Consciousness, Ironic (Dis)Engagement with Hybrid Reality Television, and Their Impact on Consumption

Russell W. Belk, Albert Muñiz, Hope Jensen Schau and Kent Grayson (eds.), Research in Consumer Behavior, 2011

15 Pages Posted: 24 Nov 2015

See all articles by Cristel Russell

Cristel Russell

American University - Kogod School of Business

Date Written: 2011

Abstract

Purpose – Hybrid reality television, a burgeoning subgenre spawning from the reality television genre, distinguishes itself from its parent genre through dramatizations that have been described as presenting a "quasi-reality" that is disorientating for the viewer (Caramanica, 2010). In addition to blurring the lines between fact and fiction, hybrid reality programs blur the lines between product placement and entertainment as products are seamlessly blended into the depicted lifestyles. This research explores how consumers negotiate hybrid reality television programs and how this process transpires in viewers’ reactions to the consumption portrayals within the programs.

Suggested Citation

Russell, Cristel, Realistically Fake: Self-Reflexive Consciousness, Ironic (Dis)Engagement with Hybrid Reality Television, and Their Impact on Consumption (2011). Russell W. Belk, Albert Muñiz, Hope Jensen Schau and Kent Grayson (eds.), Research in Consumer Behavior, 2011. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2691670

Cristel Russell (Contact Author)

American University - Kogod School of Business ( email )

4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20816-8044
United States

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