Do Differences in Schools' Instruction Time Explain International Achievement Gaps? Evidence from Developed and Developing Countries

28 Pages Posted: 18 Nov 2015

See all articles by Victor Lavy

Victor Lavy

University of Warwick - Department of Economics; Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Department of Economics; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: November 2015

Abstract

The time that children spend in school varies across countries. Do these differences explain international gaps in pupils' academic achievements? In this article I estimate the effects of instructional time on students' achievement using PISA 2006 data, which include data samples from over 50 countries. I find that instructional time has a positive and significant effect on test scores, and that the effect is much lower in developing countries. Evidence also suggests that the productivity of instructional time is higher in countries which implemented school accountability measures or that gave schools autonomy in budgetary decisions and in hiring/firing teachers.

Suggested Citation

Lavy, Victor, Do Differences in Schools' Instruction Time Explain International Achievement Gaps? Evidence from Developed and Developing Countries (November 2015). Feature Issue, Vol. 125, Issue 588, pp. F397-F424, 2015. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2692313 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecoj.12233

Victor Lavy (Contact Author)

University of Warwick - Department of Economics ( email )

Coventry CV4 7AL
United Kingdom

Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Department of Economics ( email )

Mount Scopus
Jerusalem, 91905
Israel
+972 2 588 3245 (Phone)
+972 2 581 6071 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
0
Abstract Views
174
PlumX Metrics