Commentary on Szmukler: Mental Illness, Dangerousness, and Involuntary Civil Commitment

Philosophy and Psychiatry: Problems, Intersections, and New Perspectives, ed. Daniel D. Moseley and Gary J. Gala (Routledge, 2016), pp. 147-60.

14 Pages Posted: 9 Dec 2015 Last revised: 11 Dec 2015

See all articles by Ken Levy

Ken Levy

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge - Paul M. Hebert Law Center

Alex Cohen

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

Date Written: August 1, 2015

Abstract

Prof. Cohen and I answer six questions: (1) Why do we lock people up? (2) How can involuntary civil commitment be reconciled with people's constitutional right to liberty? (3) Why don't we treat homicide as a public health threat? (4) What is the difference between legal and medical approaches to mental illness? (5) Why is mental illness required for involuntary commitment? (6) Where are we in our efforts to understand the causes of mental illness?

Keywords: George Szmukler, mental illness, DSM-V, dangerousness, involuntary civil commitment, involuntary outpatient treatment, criminal punishment, liberty, public health, suicide, homicide, retributivism, consequentialism, expressivism

Suggested Citation

Levy, Ken and Cohen, Alex, Commentary on Szmukler: Mental Illness, Dangerousness, and Involuntary Civil Commitment (August 1, 2015). Philosophy and Psychiatry: Problems, Intersections, and New Perspectives, ed. Daniel D. Moseley and Gary J. Gala (Routledge, 2016), pp. 147-60.. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2699272

Ken Levy (Contact Author)

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge - Paul M. Hebert Law Center ( email )

420 Law Center Building
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
United States

Alex Cohen

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge ( email )

Baton Rouge, LA 70803
United States

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