Does Crime Pay? The Effect of Off-Field Behavior on Player Salaries In the National Football League

18 Pages Posted: 9 Dec 2015 Last revised: 16 Dec 2016

See all articles by Brad R. Humphreys

Brad R. Humphreys

West Virginia University - Department of Economics

Rob W. Simmons

Lancaster University

Brian Soebbing

University of Alberta-Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation

Date Written: October 1, 2014

Abstract

Mixed evidence exists on the relationship between arrest and labor market outcomes such as employment and earnings. We analyze the effect of arrest on earnings in a sample of National Football League players who were arrested between 2000 and 2009. We use propensity score matching to construct a comparison sample of players who were not arrested over the same period. Regression results suggest that players who were arrested earned about 10% to 14% more than similar players who were not arrested. Relatively lower risk aversion and aggressive tendencies may explain this difference in compensation.

Keywords: arrest, earnings, National Football League

JEL Classification: L83, J31

Suggested Citation

Humphreys, Brad R. and Simmons, Rob W. and Soebbing, Brian, Does Crime Pay? The Effect of Off-Field Behavior on Player Salaries In the National Football League (October 1, 2014). Fox School of Business Research Paper 16-005, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2699292 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2699292

Brad R. Humphreys

West Virginia University - Department of Economics ( email )

Morgantown, WV 26506
United States

Rob W. Simmons

Lancaster University ( email )

Brian Soebbing (Contact Author)

University of Alberta-Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation

Edmonton, Alberta
Canada

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