In the Wake of Thoreau: Four Morden Legal Philosophers and the Theory of Nonviolent Civil Disobedience

38 Pages Posted: 9 Dec 2015

See all articles by Stephen R. Alton

Stephen R. Alton

Texas A&M University School of Law

Date Written: 1992

Abstract

This Article opens with a discussion of Thoreau's philosophy of civil disobedience and then examines the ideas of four modem legal philosophers, Joseph Raz, Kent Greenawalt, John Rawls, and Ronald Dworkin, on the subject. Next, the Article compares the respective thinking of all five men regarding the circumstances that would justify the use of civil disobedience. To facilitate the comparison as well as to make it more relevant to the reader, the Article examines five related contemporary illustrations involving situations in which the use of civil disobedience might arguably be morally justified. This Article concludes with some general thoughts on the circumstances justifying the use of nonviolent civil disobedience.

Suggested Citation

Alton, Stephen R., In the Wake of Thoreau: Four Morden Legal Philosophers and the Theory of Nonviolent Civil Disobedience (1992). Loyola University Chicago Law Journal, Vol. 24, 1992, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2700297

Stephen R. Alton (Contact Author)

Texas A&M University School of Law ( email )

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Fort Worth, TX 76102
United States
817-212-4115 (Phone)

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