Incumbent Landscapes, Disruptive Uses: Perspectives on Marijuana-Related Land Use Control

3 Texas A&M Journal of Property Law 35 (2016) (symposium)

33 Pages Posted: 14 Dec 2015 Last revised: 6 Jul 2016

Donald J. Kochan

Chapman University, The Dale E. Fowler School of Law

Date Written: December 13, 2015

Abstract

The story behind the move toward marijuana’s legality is a story of disruptive forces to the incumbent legal and physical landscape. It affects incumbent markets, incumbent places, the incumbent regulatory structure, and the legal system in general which must mediate the battles involving the push for relaxation of illegality and adaptation to accepting new marijuana-related land uses, against efforts toward entrenchment, resilience, and resistance to that disruption.

This Article is entirely agnostic on the issue of whether we should or should not decriminalize, legalize, or otherwise increase legal tolerance for marijuana or any other drugs. Nonetheless, we must grapple with the fact that many jurisdictions are embracing a type of “legality innovation” regarding marijuana. I define “legality innovation” as that effect which begins with the change in law that leads to the development of the lawful relevance of, lawful business regarding, and legal use for a newly-legal product, the successful deployment of which depends on the relative acceptance of the general public which must provide a venue for its operations along with the relative change in the consuming public’s attitudes as a result of the introduction of legality.

Marijuana-related land uses are and will be controversial. Regulatory responses, neighborhood disputes, permit battles, and opposition coalitions are all predictable both as a matter of logical analysis in light of legal standards but also, very importantly, due to the lessons of history with similarly-situated, precursor land uses like liquor stores, adult entertainment, bars, nightclubs, massage parlors, and the like leading the way. The Article also discusses the role of incumbent interests groups in shaping the new marijuana-related regulatory structure, including revealing Baptist and bootlegger coalitions that exist to oppose relaxation of marijuana laws and thwart land use successes of the marijuana industry in order to maintain their incumbent value or profit position. Finally, the Article engages with the growing literature in the social sciences on place and space, examining how the spaces and places we inhabit and in which we conduct our business and social affairs are necessarily impacted whenever legality innovations like we are seeing with marijuana work to disrupt the incumbent landscape.

Keywords: land use, property, marijuana legalization, marijuana decriminalization, marijuana-related land use, disruptive innovation, legality innovation, Baptists and Bootleggers, place and space, local government, zoning, permitting, licensing, nuisance, liquor stores, interest group theory

Suggested Citation

Kochan, Donald J., Incumbent Landscapes, Disruptive Uses: Perspectives on Marijuana-Related Land Use Control (December 13, 2015). 3 Texas A&M Journal of Property Law 35 (2016) (symposium). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2702887

Donald J. Kochan (Contact Author)

Chapman University, The Dale E. Fowler School of Law ( email )

One University Drive
Orange, CA 92866-1099
United States
714-628-2618 (Phone)
714-628-2576 (Fax)

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