Stolen Generations: Online Testimonies as Sources of Social Justice: Towards an Ethics of Encounter

Australia and New Zealand Law and History E-Journal, vol. 2013, no. 10, pp. 1-13

13 Pages Posted: 16 Dec 2015

See all articles by Honni van Rijswijk

Honni van Rijswijk

University of Technology Sydney, Faculty of Law

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

In this paper, I am using the provocation of "the source" to examine the significance of a recent iteration of Stolen Generations testimonies to questions of contemporary social justice. This testimonial form has had a complicated and fraught history across Australian legal and cultural domains: in the handful of cases that have dealt with injuries arising out of the Stolen Generations, courts have placed oral testimony in contest with state documentary records; oral testimony has also featured in different iterations of extra-legal Stolen Generations projects, which have been produced by state, corporate and Indigenous parties, sometimes leading to the problem of testimonies being co-opted into state and private projects, which do not necessarily benefit Indigenous people.

Suggested Citation

van Rijswijk, Honni, Stolen Generations: Online Testimonies as Sources of Social Justice: Towards an Ethics of Encounter (2013). Australia and New Zealand Law and History E-Journal, vol. 2013, no. 10, pp. 1-13. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2703751

Honni Van Rijswijk (Contact Author)

University of Technology Sydney, Faculty of Law ( email )

Sydney
Australia

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
14
Abstract Views
220
PlumX Metrics