Life Satisfaction Among Aboriginals in the Canadian Prairies: Evidence from the Equality, Security and Community Survey

The International Indigenous Policy Journal, 2015

Posted: 10 Apr 2016

Date Written: December 1, 2015

Abstract

Subjective measures of overall quality of life are increasingly analyzed as indicators of human well-being and social progress. Yet in Canada there are very few such data from Aboriginal respondents. We report on two surveys which do solicit life satisfaction assessments from Aboriginal respondents, and compare inferences from such data to those for the general Canadian population. With some interesting exceptions, we find generally comparable effects of objective life circumstances, and use these to explain some of the advantages and disadvantages affecting each sample. We propose that policy interest in life satisfaction as a gauge for improving lives is appropriate in the case of Aboriginal groups in Canada, just as for other populations in Canada and around the world.

Keywords: subjective well-being, happiness, life satisfaction, income, Aboriginal, Canada, development

JEL Classification: I3, I31, D6, O1

Suggested Citation

Barrington-Leigh, Christopher, Life Satisfaction Among Aboriginals in the Canadian Prairies: Evidence from the Equality, Security and Community Survey (December 1, 2015). The International Indigenous Policy Journal, 2015, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2705673

Christopher Barrington-Leigh (Contact Author)

McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy

Charles Meredith House
1130 Pine Avenue West
Montreal, Quebec H3A1A3
Canada

HOME PAGE: http://barrington-leigh.net/address

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
212
PlumX Metrics