Race-of-Victim Discrepancies in Homicides and Executions, Louisiana 1976-2015

Loyola University New Orleans Journal of Public Interest Law, Volume 17, Fall 2015

16 Pages Posted: 23 Dec 2015 Last revised: 22 Aug 2016

See all articles by Frank Baumgartner

Frank Baumgartner

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill

Tim Lyman

Northeastern University, Institute for Security and Public Policy at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice

Date Written: August 1, 2015

Abstract

Black male victims comprise 61 percent of homicide victims in present day Louisiana, yet their killers have been executed in only three cases out of 12,949 homicides since Gregg v. Georgia reinstated the death penalty in 1976. This is less than 6 percent of the execution rate for killers of all other victims, and 1/48th the execution rate for the killers of white women. A thorough analysis of Louisiana's homicides and a complete review of its history of executions, using FBI statistics and the Espy File of national executions, reveals that the ultimate punishment has long been reserved for crimes other than killing black men. New here is the compilation and analysis of a complete database of all 241 Louisiana post-Gregg death verdict cases, including their 316 victims. In these cases, 80 percent of the victims are people other than black males.

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2772052

Keywords: executions, homicides, death penalty, Louisiana, punishment, death verdicts, black males

JEL Classification: C12, J70, K14

Suggested Citation

Baumgartner, Frank and Lyman, Tim, Race-of-Victim Discrepancies in Homicides and Executions, Louisiana 1976-2015 (August 1, 2015). Loyola University New Orleans Journal of Public Interest Law, Volume 17, Fall 2015. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2706787 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2706787

Frank Baumgartner

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill ( email )

102 Ridge Road
Chapel Hill, NC NC 27514
United States

Tim Lyman (Contact Author)

Northeastern University, Institute for Security and Public Policy at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice ( email )

204 Churchill Hall
360 Huntington Ave
Boston, MA 02115
United States
(504) 895-7951 (Phone)

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