From Cybercrime to Cyberwar? The International Policy Shift and its Implications for Canada

Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, Vol.19 (2), 127-143, 2013

38 Pages Posted: 27 Dec 2015 Last revised: 29 Dec 2015

See all articles by Avner Levin

Avner Levin

Ryerson University, Ted Rogers School of Management

Paul Goodrick

Ryerson University - Ted Rogers School of Management

Date Written: June 1, 2013

Abstract

Countries are creating strategies to defend themselves from cyberwar and cyber-espionage in response to cyber attacks such as Stuxnet, Flame and the use of social media in national conflicts. Nations are grouping in blocs for these strategies along traditional international-relations lines. Combating cybercrime is becoming more difficult, and less important, as a result, since potential partners in crime-fighting must increasingly treat each other as cyber opponents. Canada should not abandon potential partnerships with China, Russia and their allies because of increased cyber-warfare concerns. Canada should strive for a middle ground that that will allow Canada to cooperate with every country as long as that cooperation advances the Canadian interest in a more secure cyberspace for Canadians.

Keywords: cybercrime, cyberwar, cyber-strategy, stuxnet, cyber-security

Suggested Citation

Levin, Avner and Goodrick, Paul, From Cybercrime to Cyberwar? The International Policy Shift and its Implications for Canada (June 1, 2013). Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, Vol.19 (2), 127-143, 2013. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2708076

Avner Levin (Contact Author)

Ryerson University, Ted Rogers School of Management ( email )

350 Victoria Street
Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
Canada

Paul Goodrick

Ryerson University - Ted Rogers School of Management ( email )

350 Victoria Street
Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3
Canada

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